Sharing the Journey, sharing our stories

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Bishop Mark with Shakirul Islam, Shamsun Nahar & Omar Faruque from CAFOD partner OKUP

 

Marking Refugee Week we’re celebrating all of the fantastic stories we’ve been hearing a sharing of all of the Share the Journey actions that have taken place and are planned around the Diocese of Plymouth .

Bishop Mark helped us start our Share the Journey action by leading our campaign day at Buckfast Abbey on 5th May; opening the event with a powerful address on the Holy Father’s campaign, which inspired us all to immerse ourselves in the campaign and revisit our own stories of migration and refugees through his personal reflection and encouragement.

Speaking at the event we also heard from Shakirul Islam, Shamsun Nahar & Omar Faruque from CAFOD’s partner OKUP organisation in Bangladesh, about their vital work protecting migrant workers from abuse and supporting them afterwards. We were also joined by Libby Abbott from CAFOD’s campaign team who gave us a great overview of the Share Journey campaign and Nick Hanrahan from JRS who talked about their work with refugees in the UK.

At the Share the Journey event, organised by CAFOD and the Diocesan Justice and Peace commission, CAFOD volunteers and supporters joined J&P activists began to plan their campaign actions together.

Over the past few weeks parishes have been organising their Share the Journey walks and campaign actions around the diocese, and schools have organised whole school community and staff walks too! We have been inspired to hear about all of the actions and hope to hear stories from many other communities about their actions too; please  let us know your plans and share your stories and pics by emailing plymouth@cafod.org.uk

…in the meantime see below a few of the beautiful photos from St Mary’s Abbey, Buckfast’s combined parish Share the Journey walk.

For more information about the Share the Journey campaign visit: https://cafod.org.uk/Campaign/Share-the-Journey or call us in the office on 01752 268768.

Annual Exeter BBQ raises £1,000 for Ethiopian Food Crisis

 

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Last Saturday, CAFOD members at Blessed Sacrament in Exeter held their fifth annual BBQ and raised over £1,000. This year’s event was particularly vital in raising money to help the more than 10 million people in Ethiopia who are in need of food, clean water and basic sanitation.

The final of the seniors boules competition

Boules final

 

The day’s organiser, Chris Wightman, said;

“This is the fifth year that the event has been held. Over 60 people came along and joined in the fun which included a gastronomic feast of canapes, nibbles, barbequed minted lamb, peppered pork, prawns, Chinese marinated chicken, burgers and sausages served with coleslaw, salad, potatoes, bread rolls. This was all washed down with a range of alcoholic and non-alcoholic beverages.

Enjoying the BBQ 2

Boules final

“The young and not so young joined in the games which included Connect 4, Giant Pick-a-sticks, boules, Twister and Croquet. As usual tickets were free but proceeds from the raffle, donations and gift aided donations on the day means that £1000 will be going off to CAFOD’s Ethopia Food Crisis Appeal.”

This was a day of fun and the community of Exeter joined together to help the communities of Ethiopia – thank you.

If you would like to hold your own events to fundraise you can get some ideas here 

In Ethiopia, the second failed rainy season in a row, fuelled by one of the strongest El Nino weather patterns recorded, has casued serve drought across the country. CAFOD is appealing for £3 million to scale up its current work across four of the most areas in need; SNNPR Region State, Oromia Regional State, Tigray and Afar Regional Sates.

These states include some of the poorest people in the country – agro-pastoralists, farming and pastoralist communities, who rely heavily on subsistence farming and livestock. The lack of harvest has had a devastating impact on people’s ability to feed their families and animals.

Learn more about the Ethiopia food crisis 

In a months the country’s long rains are due to fall. It will, however, still take time for people to harvest their crops and replenish their livestock in what will be a critical month as they face a deepening ‘hunger gap’.

By Maxwell Dean

 

Plymouth’s Run for Women Helps to chase down Gender and Poverty Inequality Gap

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This year’s annual five mile Run for Women saw over 1,000 students, staff and parents from Plymouth raise money for CAFOD and in doing so, play their part in helping women and girls in some of the poorest countries throughout the world.

The event was born when Simon Giarchi teamed with co-organiser Leah Burch to highlight the existing poverty and gender inequality gap, as girls currently make up 70% of the world’s 1 billion poorest people. As Simon, who works in the CAFOD office in Plymouth explains:

“The Run for Women started in 2011, marking the centenary of International Women’s day, and this will be the 6th year the run has taken place. We have had over 10,000 participants, pupils, parents and teachers, raising many thousands of pounds for the vital work that CAFOD does with women and girls in their communities.”

Learn more about the work of CAFOD 

Leah Burch, who stepped in to organise the event this year, after Simon had a new arrival in the family, said:

“The run for women across the seven Plymouth schools was a huge success.”

As part of this event each participating school arranged their own course, either creating a route around their campus, or allowing students to run around local parks and athletic tracks.

Learn how to organise your own fundraising events 

One enthusiast participant, Rachael Riley, a teacher at Holy Cross, said:

“Great start to the day with a 5 mile run from Notre Dame, cheered on by the school!”

Most importantly, the funds raised from the Run for Women will go directly to CAFOD’s partners in 35 countries who work in partnership to help girls reach their potential through education and training and thereby empowering them to become community leaders.

by Maxwell Dean